Tuesday, 5 May 2009

St. Pius V

Today is the fast of St. Pius V the energetic sixteenth century pope perhaps most famous for the Missal and Breviary he promulgated. Today is also the seventh day in the Octave of the Solemnity of St. Joseph Patron of the Universal Church.

The feast is of double rite. As noted in yesterday's post Vespers was 'from the chapter of the following' i.e. of St. Pius V. If one was using the Breviary Pius V had promulgated in 1568 with the bull Quod a nobis this would have meant (applying the rules to the current Kalendar) that the antiphons and psalms at Vespers would have been from the Common of Non-Virgins, i.e. St. Monica's Office, with the first antiphon Dum esset Rex etc and the first psalm 109 sung to tone 3a. The other antiphons and psalms would have been from the common. The chapter would have been Ecce sacerdos magnus and the rest from the Common of a Confessor Bishop. However, using the breviary promulgated after the 1911-13 reform whilst the 'from the chapter' rule for concurrence is maintained it loses its meaning somewhat as instead of the antiphons and psalms coming from the common they are taken from the ferial psalter hence the antiphons and psalms of Monday were used; i.e. the antiphon Alleluia and psalm 114 sung to tone 1g2. Now the point I am trying to make is that under the new arrangement the 'from the chapter of the following' is rather meaningless as first Vespers of St. Pius V would use exactly the same psalmody with the post 1913 rules. In 'Ordo speak' V a cap seq, com praec now equates to V seq, com praec.

Mattins, of course, has three nocturns. In the first nocturn lessons are from the book of the Apocalypse that was began yesterday. The second nocturn has the usual historical lessons and the third nocturn a homily of St. Gregory the Great on St. Matthew's Gospel. At Lauds a commemoration of the Octave is made. At Prime the first announcement in the Martyrology is of tomorrow's Octave Day of the Solemnity of St. Joseph. Hymns of Iambic metre of course have the Paschaltide Doxology.

Mass follows Terce. The Mass formulary is Statuit ei Dominus and the Gospel of the talents. The Gloria is sung, the second collect is of the Octave, the Credo is sung and the preface that of St. Joseph.

Vespers is first Vespers of the following Octave Day of St. Joseph with a commemoration of St. Pius V and St. John before the Latin Gate.

In the 'liturgical books' of 1962 St. Pius V has had the usual treatment and cut down to a third class feast with just one nocturn of three lessons and has no Gospel. No commemoration is made at Lauds. The hymns of the Little Hours do not have the Paschaltide Doxology. The Mass texts are all different except the collect. This is not actually a 1962 change but reflects a decree of the SRC in 1942 that made sweeping changes to about twenty-five days in the liturgical year. Popes were given their own proper with the effect that many ancient texts, e.g. such as Juravit unique to the feast of St. Gregory on March 12th, were simply swept aside. Change for the sake of change does appear to be very much a characteristic of that period. In the 1962 mass then the texts will be different, there is no Octave to commemorate, no Creed and the preface is the common one. Vespers will be of the feast without any commemorations.

One does rather wonder what St. Pius V would make of the many changes made to the Missal and Breviary he promulgated?

11 comments:

gemoftheocean said...

Interesting. I was at Mass this morning, and I don't have a new missal, but have 3 different missals I use to follow the Mass, an "all in Latin" handmissal with tiny type, printed in the early 20s, a Missal printed in 48 and on from the 50s. The last I use because it has the biggest typefont. Drawback is it is Sundays only. So I usually use the 40s missal (because it has the English for the epistle and Gospel and then I read it, but use the Latin Missal from the 20s during Mass so I could follow in latin.)

I knew there were changes throughout the 1900s here and there, but was curious quite when that change was. I too noticed the change from the 20s Mass For
Pope/Confessors which was "Statuit ei Dominus (etc)" It was a commons for such popes Commune Confessoris Pontificis." The only changes from the common were the opening prayer, Secret and post Communion.

The 48 Missal had the "si diligis me" Commons. rather different, and it surprised me.

Is there a list of the 25 affected masses? I'm new at followin the Latin Mass (as an adult anyway, I had a little experience as a young child.)

I couldn't even FIND the "Statuit" Mass in the 40s missal, though granted I haven't looked all the way through every possible type of Common.

Is there a good website which shows a list of all the changes throughout the 20th century? I'd be curious to see a detail list somewhere.

Thanks,
Karen

Rubricarius said...

Karen,

I'll provide more info later. I am currently visiting a friend in the North of England but will be back to my desk on Saturday.

gemoftheocean said...

Thanks, much appreciated! I'll check back.

Anonymous said...

The Sacred Congregation of Rites by decree, on 9 January 1942, introduced for the Missal and Breviary a new Common Office and Mass of the Holy Popes, either Martyrs or Confessors. This was done "to distinguish from other sainted bishops, the importance of the Roman Pontiff, to render him the homage of our whole submission, and to answer, by a particular sign of attachment, to the innumerous attacks and insults of those our days against the Holy See of Peter."
+DM

The following feasts of Popes have now the Mass "Si diligis me":
5 January. St. Telesphorus
11 January. St. Hyginus
16 January. St. Marcellus I
4 March. St. Lucius
12 March. St. Gregory the Great
11 April. St. Leo I
17 April. St. Anicetus
22 April. SS. Soter & Caius
26 Arpil. SS. Cletus & Marcellinus
5 May. St. Pius V
19 May. St. Peter Celestine
25 May. St. Gregory VII; St. Urban, if celebrated that day.
26 May. St. Eleutherius
27 May. St. John I
30 May. St. Felix I
20 June. St. Silverius
3 July. St. Leo II
11 July. St. Pius I
13 July. St. Anacletus
2 August. St. Stephen
26 August. St. Zephyrinus
23 September. St. Linus
7 October. St. Mark
14 October. St. Callistus
26 October. St. Evaristus
12 November. St. Martin
19 November. St. Pontianus
23 November. St. Clement
10 December. St. Melchiades
11 December. St. Damasus
31 December. St. Sylvester

Rubricarius said...

And that decree imposed a banal and pedestrian composition that at the stroke of the proverbial pen wiped away something had developed over the centuries itself being changed by Cum nostra a mere thirteen years later.

The consequences of 'liturgy by decree'...

gemoftheocean said...

Many thanks, anon. for the list.

also if you can think of any good websites with all (or at least many!) of the changes over the 20th century it would be much appreciated. Or at least up til '69.

Rubricarius said...

Gem,

If you look at the SLP main website at 'Calendar Changes' you will see the effect of the various (main) changes on the rite for various months.

I shall write something later on the main stage of 20C reform.

Carlos Antonio Palad said...

"The Sacred Congregation of Rites by decree, on 9 January 1942, introduced for the Missal and Breviary a new Common Office and Mass of the Holy Popes, either Martyrs or Confessors. This was done "to distinguish from other sainted bishops, the importance of the Roman Pontiff, to render him the homage of our whole submission, and to answer, by a particular sign of attachment, to the innumerous attacks and insults of those our days against the Holy See of Peter.""

I find it interesting that one of the chief effects of the heightened devotion to the papal office in the last 100 years, has been the slow but steady destruction of the very liturgy that the papacy is supposed to safeguard.

By their fruits thou shalt know them. If there is anything that proves that there is something fundamentally wrong with the way the papacy has been understood by the generality of the Church in the past 100 years, it would be the way that this understanding of the papacy has become an accomplice in the destruction of the classical Roman Rite.

Pio Nono would be scandalized at the way the powers of the papacy have been misused since the beginning of the 20th century.

Carlos Antonio Palad said...

"And that decree imposed a banal and pedestrian composition that at the stroke of the proverbial pen wiped away something had developed over the centuries itself being changed by Cum nostra a mere thirteen years later."

Esteemed Rubricarius:

Could you please lay out the extent of the destruction caused by this? How many proper Masses were lost?

Anonymous said...

Carlos Antonio Palad said:

By their fruits thou shalt know them. If there is anything that proves that there is something fundamentally wrong with the way the papacy has been understood by the generality of the Church in the past 100 years, it would be the way that this understanding of the papacy has become an accomplice in the destruction of the classical Roman Rite.
----------------------------------
I think it was Archbishop Lefebvre's seminary professor Fr Le Floch who warned that the heresy of exaggerated importance to the Papacy was in the making ....he was was soon given the kick for his concern

gemoftheocean said...

Thanks for the pointer, Rubricarius